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Climate and Energy

TJX video demonstrating how sourcing renewable energy is an important part of TJX's Environmental Sustainability strategy. TJX aims to achieve United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 13 and Goal 7 TJX video demonstrating how sourcing renewable energy is an important part of TJX's Environmental Sustainability strategy.

FY21 Global Results

404 million

kilowatt hours of low-carbon
energy purchased

154,000

metric tons reduction in global
greenhouse gas emissions

Stores Account for 80% of Our Carbon Footprint1

Carbon Footprint graph: 80% Stores, 15% Distribution Centers, 3% Offices, 2% Vehicles

Electricity is Our Largest Source of GHG Emissions1

GHG Emissions graph: 84% Electricity, 11% Onsite Fuels, 3% Transport Fuels, 2% Refrigerants

Managing and mitigating TJX’s climate impact is a key focus area of our environmental sustainability program. We have historically focused our climate strategy on the emissions created by our direct operations, meaning the energy used to power our stores, home offices, distribution (or processing) centers, and vehicles. Our approach includes:

Calculating the carbon emissions impact of our business operations and select Scope 3 emissions sources (from business travel and waste):

Setting a science-based emissions reduction target:

Reducing our global climate impact through a balanced portfolio of emissions-reduction activities focused on:

Reporting on our climate strategy, including risks and opportunities to our business, including:

Looking ahead

As our climate and energy strategies continue to evolve, we plan to identify efforts that are impactful to our stakeholders, the environment, and are feasible to implement within our business model. One of the areas where we expect to provide updates to our strategy includes supply chain climate impact and Scope 3 emissions sources.

  • FY21 Key Climate and Energy Metrics2

    Global Highlights

    U.S. Highlights:

    Renewable and low-carbon energy:

    Canada Highlights:

    Here’s how TJX Canada achieved these results:

    Europe Highlights:

    Here’s how TJX Europe achieved these results:

    Conserving Energy:
    Renewable Energy:
  • Managing and Conserving Energy In Our Direct Operations

    Operations teams in each of our geographies proactively work to reduce our energy and fuel consumption. These efforts help us do our part in contributing to a solution to help limit global warming. These teams manage our energy consumption and costs, analyze and improve our operational performance, and test, prioritize, and implement energy efficiency technologies in the facilities and vehicles we operate. These efforts play a key part in the implementation of our long-term science-based GHG emissions reduction target.

    Our regional Energy Management teams work with the goal of reducing energy and electricity-related emissions with these key strategies:

    We also work to reduce and conserve fuels in our fleet vehicles and in those areas where we directly manage our logistics and distribution, like in the U.K. and Ireland outbound store deliveries. These emissions are part of our direct operations (Scope 1 emissions), and are reported in our corporate carbon footprint. These also fall within the scope of our global corporate science-based GHG emissions reduction target. Together with our partners, we continually work on new ideas to increase fuel efficiency and reduce costs, with the goal of decreasing the impact of our vehicles on the environment. Our key strategies for reducing these emissions include:

    In the U.K. and Ireland, we:

    See below for more details on our transportation and logistics efforts.

  • Avoiding and Offsetting Emissions

    We source low-carbon and renewable energy to further reduce our GHG emissions from electricity consumption. In certain geographies, we leverage carbon offsets5 to offset emissions resulting from our direct operations and business travel.

    Renewable and Low-Carbon Energy

    As a global company, we operate in many different energy and renewables markets. Opportunities for sourcing renewable energy vary greatly from country to country and even within regions. As we typically do not build or own our stores, our onsite, renewable electricity-generation opportunities are limited. Therefore, we continue to evaluate alternative energy solutions and purchasing opportunities for facilities that we own, taking into account the economic and operational feasibility of specific projects. Some examples of our current sourcing strategies include:

    In fiscal 2021, we sourced over 325 million kilowatt hours of renewable energy in total, generated from a variety of technologies. Together, our renewable and low-carbon energy sourcing strategy in fiscal 2021 enabled us to reduce our Scope 2 market-based GHG inventory by more than 146,000 metric tons of CO2e, or by about 25% over the prior year.

  • Supply Chain Climate Impact

    While our focus has historically been on the climate-related impact of our direct operations where we have the most control over our facilities energy and fuel usage, we acknowledge there are climate-related impacts present in retail supply chains. To better understand those impacts, we are working to estimate those emissions from certain Scope 3 sources in our supply chain and assess the feasibility of setting a science-based emissions reduction target related to Scope 3 emissions.

  • Transportation and Logistics

    The majority of TJX’s climate impact from transportation and logistics come from the use of energy and fuels used by transportation and distribution carriers who move merchandise from our vendors to our stores. These emissions are considered part of our Scope 3 emissions footprint and we annually estimate and share the data internally to help us better understand the climate-related impact of certain aspects our supply chain.

    Our logistics teams worldwide seek out strategies and technology solutions that can help us increase the efficiency of our transportation operations. We strive to conserve fuel, reduce travel time, and decrease the number of trucks on the road. We use a variety of strategies and technologies to support this goal, for example, using modeling software to improve the efficiency of our store delivery network, increasing utilization of trailer space, and testing new alternative fuel vehicles. Additionally, we work with transport partners through programs like SmartWay in the U.S. and FleetSmart in Canada.

    In the U.S.:

     

    In Canada:

    In Europe:

  • Green Building

    As we construct new buildings, we incorporate environmentally sustainable features when feasible. For example, our newly constructed distribution centers and processing centers are built to enable the addition of onsite solar arrays and we consistently evaluate the potential to add these alternative forms of energy to our energy portfolio. Furthermore, when we move into existing properties, as part of the renovation process, our design teams typically consider ways to improve energy efficiency and water conservation and to develop recycling infrastructure where feasible. See a global list of environmentally sustainable building projects.

    Throughout much of TJX Canada’s regional headquarters, environmentally sustainable features are incorporated, including Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)-certified, reclaimed wood, low or no volatile organic compound paints and flooring, and other sustainable materials in the interior finishes, workstations, outdoor areas, and cafeteria. We have special hybrid and electric vehicle charging stations and a vegetable and herb garden that is managed by Associates, which was put on hold when the office was closed due to the pandemic. We purchased renewable energy credits to offset the electricity carbon footprint for this building.

    For our new European headquarters, of which the first phase opened in fiscal 2020, we achieved an “Excellent” BREEAM certification (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, an environmental assessment method and rating system for buildings) for the design based on the building’s environmental sustainability credentials. We chose building materials with low embodied carbon emissions and are working with lumber companies that meet environmental standards to help promote responsible forestry. Additionally, we have updated fixtures in our bathrooms to help use less water. We are also installing beehives on the roof of our offices in fiscal 2022, as well as native landscaping to support improving biodiversity in the local area.

FY21 Global Results

404 million

kilowatt hours of low-carbon energy purchased

154,000

metric tons reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions

404 million

kilowatt hours of low-carbon energy purchased

154,000

metric tons reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions

Stores Account for 80% of Our Carbon Footprint1

Carbon Footprint graph: 80% Stores, 15% Distribution Centers, 3% Offices, 2% Vehicles

Electricity is Our Largest Source of GHG Emissions1

GHG Emissions graph: 84% Electricity, 11% Onsite Fuels, 3% Transport Fuels, 2% Refrigerants

Stores Account for 80% of Our Carbon Footprint1

Carbon Footprint graph: 80% Stores, 15% Distribution Centers, 3% Offices, 2% Vehicles

Electricity is Our Largest Source of GHG Emissions1

GHG Emissions graph: 84% Electricity, 11% Onsite Fuels, 3% Transport Fuels, 2% Refrigerants

1Includes FY21 Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (indirect) GHG emissions. Data based on location-based emissions.
2The magnitude of some of the reductions was partially driven by temporary store closures across all regions due to COVID-19. In particular, our energy use, business travel, and waste generated in operations were lower in FY21 than FY20.
3As defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol, Scope 1 emissions are direct GHG emissions that occur from sources that are owned or controlled by the company. Scope 2 emissions are from the generation of purchased energy consumed by the company. Scope 3 emissions are a consequence of the activities of the company, but occur from sources not owned or controlled by the company. Canada’s GHG Inventory includes Scope 1 and Scope 2 as well as Scope 3 business travel and waste from operations.
4Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) is a widely used, voluntary program for the certification of GHG emission reduction projects.
5Carbon offsets are certificates that can be traded. The certificate represents a reduction in GHG emissions created by a project, like, for example, planting acres of trees. Companies can purchase these certificates to “offset” an increase in GHG emissions in their operations.
6Transportation involving more than one form of carrier during a single journey.